5 Succulents With Red Flowers: Caring And Propagation Guide

If you’re looking for a beautiful and low-maintenance plant to add to your garden, succulents are a great option. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at five different succulent plants that have red flowers. Whether you’re a beginner or an experienced gardener, you’re sure to find the perfect plant for your garden!

Christmas Cactus

close up shot of a beautiful flower of christmas cactus

Christmas cactus is a beautiful succulent that is native to Brazil. It has long, curved stems that are covered in flattened, segmented leaves. The leaves are typically green, but they can also be red, pink, or purple.

During the Christmas season, the plant produces small, red flowers that bloom in clusters.

Christmas cactus is a hardy plant that is relatively easy to care for. It prefers moderate sunlight and well-draining soil.

The plant should be allowed to dry out between watering. Christmas cactus is a nice addition to your indoor succulent collection because it is relatively low-maintenance and it blooms during the holiday season.

Christmas Cactus Care

These tropical cacti with red flowers are relatively easy to care for, but there are a few things to keep in mind to ensure that your plant stays healthy and blooms year after year.

They’re not like desert cacti, which can often survive long periods of watering neglect.

Instead, the Christmas cactus prefers bright, indirect light and should be watered regularly, allowing the soil to dry out between waterings but not completely.

During the fall and winter months, you can encourage blooming with more direct sunlight, but too much can scorch its leaves. Leaving it in an east-facing window is a great way to ensure that it receives enough sunlight.

With proper care, your Christmas cactus will bring cheer to your home for many holidays to come.

Christmas Cactus Propagation

Propagating the Christmas cactus is relatively easy to do. Start with a healthy cutting. Choose a stem that is at least 4” long and has several healthy leaves. Cut the stem just below a leaf node, using a sharp knife or pruning shears.

Allow the cutting to callus in a cool, dry room for 24 hours before planting. This will help prevent rot and promote faster root growth.

Then fill a small pot with a well-draining cactus or succulent potting mix, which is usually a mixture of sand and perlite or peat.

Water the soil until it is evenly moist but not soggy. Stick the cutting into the soil, making sure that at least two leaf nodes are buried.

Firm the soil around the base of the stem. Place the pot in a warm, sunny location and keep the soil moist but not wet. New roots should grow within two to four weeks.

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Euphorbia Milii

a group of euphorbia milii red flowers

Euphorbia milii, also known as the crown of thorns or Christ plant, is a succulent that is native to Madagascar.

It has thin, curved stems that are covered in sharp thorns. The leaves are small and oval-shaped. They are typically green, but they can also be red, pink, or purple.

The plant produces small, red flowers that bloom in clusters. Euphorbia milii is a drought-tolerant plant that prefers full sun to partial shade.

It is relatively easy to care for and it makes an excellent houseplant with beautiful red flowers or addition to your outdoor succulent garden.

Euphorbia Milii Care

To care for your Euphorbia milii, water the plant deeply but infrequently, allowing the soil to dry out completely between watering.

The plant prefers bright, direct sunlight but can tolerate some shade. It is a relatively low-maintenance plant and does not require much fertilizer.

However, you can feed this succulent plant with red flowers every once in a while with a balanced succulent fertilizer during the growing season.

Euphorbia milii is susceptible to mealybugs and scale insects.

These pests can be controlled with regular applications of insecticidal soap or neem oil, but the best way to avoid these pests is by keeping your Euphorbia milii indoors.

succulent with red flowers mini trivia info

Euphorbia Propagation

The easiest way to propagate Euphorbia milii is from stem cuttings in soil. To take a stem cutting, simply cut a healthy shoot that is about 10cm to 15cm long, and remove the bottom leaves.

The newer the shoot, the easier it will be to take root. Next, dip the cutting in rooting hormone, and place it in a pot of well-draining soil.

Keep the soil moist but not wet, and provide bright indirect light.

In six to eight weeks, the cutting should have rooted and be ready to transplant into its own pot.

With a little care and attention, you can soon have a beautiful Euphorbia milii with red flowers of your own.

Flaming Katy

beautiful flowers of flaming katy

Flaming Katy is a type of succulent with red flowers that is native to Madagascar. It has long, slender leaves that are green with red or pink margins.

The plant produces clusters of small, brightly-colored red flowers that bloom from winter to spring. Flaming Katy is a drought-tolerant plant that prefers full sun to partial shade.

It is relatively easy to care for and it makes an excellent houseplant or addition to your outdoor succulent garden.

Flaming Katy Care

The best way to care for your Flaming Katy succulent with red flowers is to give it lots of bright, indirect sunlight and well-draining soil.

Flaming Katys do best with average watering — about once every one to two weeks, depending on how quickly the soil dries out.

This type of succulent with red flowers is very tolerant of drought, so err on the side of too little water rather than too much. They actually prefer to go through a little bit of dryness in between each watering.

You can fertilize your Flaming Katy every few months during the growing season, using general-purpose flowering plant food.

Be sure to avoid extreme temperatures. This plant can’t tolerate temperatures below 50 degrees or above 85 degrees, and even a light freeze will kill it.

If you live in an area with harsh winters, it’s best to grow your Flaming Katy indoors where it will be protected from the cold.

With proper care, your Flaming Katy will thrive and produce an abundance of beautiful red flowers.

Flaming Katy Propagation

Fortunately, propagating Flaming Katy is also a relatively easy task as long as you have healthy growth to cut from.

Start by using a sharp knife or pair of scissors to cut a section of stem from the plant.

Be sure to make the cut just below two sets of leaves, as this will give your cutting the best chance of taking root. Then pot your cutting in sand-enriched succulent soil and water it thoroughly.

Place it in a bright spot and wait it out!

With a little bit of patience, your cutting will soon begin to grow into a healthy plant of its own and then produces beautiful bright-colored red flowers.

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Orchid Cactus

three large flowers of orchid cactus

Orchid cactus, also known as epiphyllum or Hawaiian orchid, is a tropical plant that produces beautiful flowers once it becomes root-bound, after two to three years of growth.

The plant is native to Mexico and Central America, and it typically blooms from spring to summer.

Orchid cacti come in a variety of colors including white, pink, purple, and yellow, but the red flowers are the most vibrant and eye-catching.

As with most succulent plants, orchid cacti are relatively easy to care for and make excellent houseplants but are even better suited for outdoor growth in places where they can receive plenty of sunlight.

Orchid Cactus Care

When caring for your Orchid cactus, be sure to give it bright sunlight and well-draining soil. Water the plant when the soil is dry to the touch, about once every one to two weeks.

This will vary depending on the size of the plant and how much sunlight it gets.

This succulent type with red flowers is native to tropical climates, so its soil needs to stay moist, but not damp. During the winter months, water is less frequent.

Orchid Cactus Propagation

To propagate, fill a pot with a well-draining cactus mix or potting soil and mix in some perlite or sand for drainage. Then take a sharp knife or pruning shears and make a clean cut just below a node on the stem.

Next, allow the cutting to callus over for a few days and then insert it into the potting mix.

Water the cutting thoroughly, and then place it in a bright spot out of the direct sun. The cutting should root within four to six weeks.

After that, you can gradually increase water and fertilizer as needed. With a little patience and care, you can easily propagate your own Orchid cacti.

Burro’s Tail

petals of burros tail flower that are about to bloom

Burro’s tail is a succulent plant that is native to the mountainous regions of Mexico. It gets its name from its long, cascading stems that resemble a donkey’s tail.

Not surprisingly, the plant is also known as donkey’s tail or lamb’s tail.

Burro’s tail is a relatively easy plant to care for and makes an excellent houseplant or addition to your outdoor succulent garden.

Burro’s Tail Care

The best way to care for your Burro’s Tail succulent is to give it bright, indirect sunlight and well-draining soil.

They are susceptible to rot if overwatered, so always wait at least ten days in between waterings.

Burro’s Tail Propagation

Propagation is similar to most other succulents. Simply take a cutting from a healthy plant and allow the cut ends to callus over for a few days.

Then, pot the cutting in well-draining soil and water it thoroughly. Place the pot in a bright spot out of direct sunlight and wait for new growth to appear.

It can take several weeks or even months for this type of succulent plant to fully root, so be patient. Then soon you’ll have this succulent bearing beautiful red flowers on its own.

Conclusion

With their beautiful flowers and easy care, succulents are the perfect plants for both new gardeners and experienced horticulturists alike. If you’re looking for a splash of color in your garden, be sure to check out these five types of succulents with red flowers.

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